Category Archives: podcast

JISC Podcast on Mobile Learning

I’ve not actually had the chance to listen to this yet, but it’s on mobile learning, it’s John Traxler, so I am guessing it will be quite good.

The ‘Mobiles Enhancing Learning and Support2’ e-Learning project has been being run from The University of Wolverhampton by John Traxler, who recently spoke about the potential and possibilities of mobile learning at the recent Online Educa conference in Berlin. Robert Haymon-Collins from JISC managed to speak to John after his presentation and to hear his, and the project’s, plans and projections for 2008.

Podcast: Mobile education is the way of the future…

JISC Podcast on Mobile Learning

Photo source

Podcasting Tools and Resources

At a recent HE Academy event I presented at I offered to provide a series of links relating to resources and tools for digital video and podcasting. Here are some podcasting tools and resources.

microphone

Here are my podcasting resources.

Garageband

Apple’s Garageband is part of the iLife suite which comes pre-installed on every Mac. Though initially designed as a music recording (and creation) application, it can also be used to record (and publish) podcasts. Watch a tutorial on creating a podcast, Quicktime required.

With GarageBand, you can create your own virtual on-stage band and play along on your favourite instrument. You can record, edit and mix a song exactly as you want it, in pristine CD quality. It’s the perfect place to get your act together.

Audacity

This open source software which is available for a range of platforms allows you to both and edit audio. Quite a complicated piece of software it certainly is very powerful.

Audacity is a free, easy-to-use audio editor and recorder for Windows, Mac OS X, GNU/Linux, and other operating systems. You can use Audacity to:

  • Record live audio.
  • Convert tapes and records into digital recordings or CDs.
  • Edit Ogg Vorbis, MP3, and WAV sound files.
  • Cut, copy, splice, and mix sounds together.
  • Change the speed or pitch of a recording.
  • And more!

Wire Tap Studio

Recently released this audio application makes it not only much easier to capture and record audio on your Mac, it also makes it much easier to strike that balance between quality and file size when sharing your podcast.

Using WireTap Studio, you can record the discrete audio output of any application, as well as all system audio, or record audio input from any microphone, line-in, or audio input hardware. If you can hear it, WireTap Studio can record it. Once you have recorded your audio, you can easily organize your recordings in the convenient Recording Library, and edit them with WireTap Studio’s integrated lossless audio editor. WireTap Studio also boasts full Audio Unit effects support, for adding professional quality effects to your audio.

One of the key issues when recording podcasts is the microphone. Cheap microphones have not been calibrated (it is the calibrating which costs that is what makes a good microphone expensive), you can get good cheap microphones, but you just have to be lucky!

Photo source

iTunes U, now more than University

Apple have expanded their iTunes U service to cover other educational broadcasts beyond Universities.

iTunes U

Ars Technica in their reporting say:

Apple has now created an entire new section of “the U” just for you active learners, however. In a section coined “Beyond Campus,” Apple has begun hosting podcasts from educational sources other than academia. In a Chronicle article Apple VP of iTunes Eddy Cue says that lots of people are happy to share this educational content, but that they just didn’t have a means until now. 

Looking like their could be some more useful content available.

Britain enjoying ‘digital boom’

From a BBC News article:

The net, mobile phones and MP3 players are revolutionising how Britons spend their time, says Ofcom’s annual report.

It reveals that older media such as TV, radio and even DVDs are being abandoned in favour of more modern technology.

It also shows that women, in some age groups, are the dominant web users and older web users spend more time online than any group.

Among children it showed that web and mobile phone use is growing at the expense of video games.

Some may not believe that DVDs are old technology already! However with places like Tesco selling DVD players for £17 and with the advent of HD-DVD and Blu-Ray, downloadable films and the growth of YouTube, we must start to think of them as an old technology.

DVD

I find it interesting that the internet and the web are no longer just the playground for the young male geek, but now that women and older people are starting to use the web and are in some cases the largest group using the web. This does mean that we have real opportunities in education to continue (start) using the web to support and enhance learning.

As for children moving from games to using the web and mobile phones more, does this mean with some in the education sector looking at games for learning, have they missed the boat already and should start loo king at other areas and ignore games?

As for the growth in mp3 players (read iPod) is it time we started in FE to podcast more?

Some things to think about.

User Experience

I am attending a very interesting presentation on user experiences. Introduced by Brian Kelly he gave an overview about the tools users use and offered reasons why institutions should not try and replicate these services but integrate and use them instead.

Brian Kelly presenting at the JISC Digitisation Conference, July 2007.

The next two speakers spoke about how the British Library and Newsfilm Online are designing their sites with the end user as the focus.

There were some interesting video clips of how the (currently unavailable) Newsfilm Online website will develop.

Do traditional lectures deliver?

Undergraduates are usually way ahead of their tutors when it comes to IT. But texts, podcasts and Web 2.0 can enhance their learning

iPodConsider the evidence. Students are increasingly digitally literate and techno-savvy. There’s no longer a student stereotype; no one-size-fits-all in terms of age, diversity, disability, financial or family commitments. They live and learn in a 24/7 society, juggling family, work and social commitments. We’re also seeing the rise of students as consumers, and managing the expectations this creates falls firmly to lecturers on the front line. Students demand inspired, interactive teaching. Do traditional lectures deliver?

Read more.

Primary School pupils lead the way with blogging

Pupils from a primary school in East Dunbartonshire are at the forefront of a new digital learning phenomenon.

Children in the pilot group at Woodhill Primary School in Bishopbriggs are using blogs to communicate with schools across the UK and Europe and making podcasts on a range of subjects, including French language.

Read more

What this demonstrates is one of two things, firstly if primary school children are using web 2.0 tools and are podcasting, why is this not used more in FE, why do we find it so difficult to embed the use of this kind of technology?

Secondly as this has made the BBC News does this not mean that this is not run of the mill normal stuff that happens in primary schools, it is quite unique and special and this is why it is being reported?