Tag Archives: ipod

SDK for iPod touch too

Yesterday I mentioned that Apple were going to allow third party applications for the iPhone. What is nice is that they are also going to allow developers using their software developers kit (SDK) to create applications for the iPod touch as well.

Apple in their press release said:

P.S.: The SDK will also allow developers to create applications for iPod touch.

Excellent, this means that developers will be able to create applications for the iPhone and the iPod touch.

Thanks Gary.

BBC Review Four Wifi Media Players

The BBC has published a review of four of the top wifi capable media players currently on the market.

The Sony PSP, the Nokia N800, the Archos 605wifi and (of course) the Apple iPod touch.

Gadget lovers are spoilt for choice when it comes to portable media players, with an increasing number offering web access through wi-fi connections. We take a look at four different players – Sony’s PSP Slim, Archos 605wifi, Nokia’s N800 and the Apple iPod touch – and assess their strengths and weaknesses in different categories.

Their winner, well it’s only fair that you check out the article, but it doesn’t surprise me.

iPod touch, me touch, me like

Today I was lucky to try out the iPod touch, and yes I was impressed.

I had quite high expectations for the touch interface, and to be honest it met (and surpassed) those expectations.

Browsing was certainly easy as was navigation.

Alas the device I was using had minimal content on, but it was still possible to try out many of the features. Though it was really the touch interface I really wanted to try.

“Please switch on your mobiles”

The Guardian has an interesting article on how educational institutions are using mobile phones to enhance, support and deliver learning.

They were banned as a distraction in lectures and seminars, but now colleges and universities are exploiting them as learning platforms. Mobiles that double up as internet platforms and iPods and MP3 players that can download hefty video or audio files mean students own what is in effect a portable learning tool. Digital mobility is drawing in students through distance learning, outreach or aids for special needs. What’s more, the use of technology can be highly motivating, adding value and content in opening up entirely new teaching scenarios.

Anyone who knows me, knows that I have a passion for the use of mobile devices to support learning. I lean towards the use of portable entertainment devices as opposed to the use of PDAs. By this I mean using mobile phones, iPods, PSPs rather than the business orientated PDA (such as an iPAQ).

The PDA has many greater advantages over entertainment devices in terms of what it can deliver especially in terms of text entry and interactivity. For me though one of the key issues of any mobile device is how personal it is to the user. If you don’t own a device or even know you are going to have it for a long time, why would you use it on a regular basis or even keep it charged.

Handing out mobile devices in a classroom also seems illogical to me, why give all students a PDA when a laptop trolley (or even moving to a computer suite) would give a similar (or better) experience.

Though being on a field trip a PDA (or an UMPC) would certainly be a better choice over a traditional (heavy) laptop, more so with features such as GPS.

I also see that the mobile device as only one part of the learning design, the learning activity would not be solely delivered via a mobile device. It would be used in conjunction with non-mobile delivery and assessment.It’s also about choice.

Allowing learners to choose how, where and when they access learning has an impact on their learning compared to been dictated where and when they can learn.

As the article demonstrates I am  not alone in seeing the benefits of mobile learning.

Apple Back to School Promo

Apple have launched their “Back to School” promotion in the UK.

University just isn’t the same without a Mac and an iPod. They make the tough stuff like reports, presentations and research a little easier. And the fun stuff like music, photography and movies a lot more fun. So whether you’re a new or returning student, a lecturer or a member of staff, you can kick off the school year in style. Buy a qualifying Mac before October 30th, 2007, and get an iPod nano via mail-in rebate.

This is the new fat nano which can play video.

Find out more.

iPod touch

In a session at ALT-C I mentioned (and blogged)…

…about the rumours of new OS X based iPods, these may be wireless and may have browser capability. We should know by about 7pm tonight.

Well by 7pm we did know. I checked out the details via my phone at the conference dinner.

Apple did announce a new iPod with a touch interface (aka the iPhone) which will be available worldwide and will be wireless, have a browser and run a version of OS X.

Whether I get one, different story, £200 is a lot of money for a touch interface. I already have devices which can play music and video and portable wifi capability as well.

Having said that , it would be nice to have one, then again do I wait until the iPhone is available in the UK and get the phone element as well?

Decisions, decisions.

Whatever I decide one of the key things to remember is that our learners will by buying this iPod, they will be buying other iPods, other mp3 players, new phones, etc…. and we need to think about how they can utilise those devices to support their learning.

Can mobile learning content also be collaborative?

I really enjoyed Geoff Stead’s demonstration, Can mobile learning content also be collaborative?
– a demonstration of tools and techniques from across the UK
.

Tribal CTAD have created and trialled innovative approaches to mobile learning since 2001. Our original experimentation with m-learning materials highlighted the importance of collaborative learning experiences. This led us to a more constructivist approach when developing both tools and materials, in which collaboration and active participation are key. Our most recent developments, particularly those with the LSN, have made it easier for both tutors and students to participate, publish and develop their own materials. Research has shown that helping learners publish their own m-learning can encourage student involvement and engagement (LSN 2006).

I do find it interesting the approach based on creating content in the main for PDA type devices, in other words Windows Mobile, smart phones; this is in some ways different to my own view of mobile learning which is very much about allowing learners to access content and learning (and create content) using their own devices.

I do like the content and it would appear that the learners like the content as well.

I did mention in the presentation about the rumours of new OS X based iPods, these may be wireless and may have browser capability. We should know by about 7pm tonight.