All posts by James Clay

Day 27: Hot fads

Google Glasses
Image by Jürgen Schmidtlein from Pixabay

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

I have seen many hot fads over the years, people focus on something and assume it will radically change education.

Usually they don’t!

Second Life

Google Glasses

MOOCs

Flip Cameras

iPad

Netbooks

Prezi

Ning

OER

Digital Badges

Twitter

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day 26: Best recent EdTech Read

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

Probably this recent blog post by @Lawrie  and @nicwhitton.

looking through a telescope
Image by S. Hermann & F. Richter from Pixabay

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Ensuring excellence – Weeknote #121 – 25th June 2021

A rather busy week.

Had a few meetings about Jisc’s HE bespoke consultancy offer and next steps.

On Tuesday I did originally plan to go into the office today, but according to the desk bookings there were very few people in, so in the end I worked from home.

I delivered a presentation to the IHE Heads of Finance Network on LTR, Powering HE and how Jisc can support and help Higher Education with a particular focus on investment in digital.

Wednesday saw myself deliver the second session of an online Digital Leadership programme to a cohort of university staff. Despite the fact I had to do most of the session by myself, it did seem to go well.

On Thursday I did go to the office in Bristol. There was a lot more people in the office than normal, however as I had a fair few online interviews and meetings, I spent most of the day in one of our meeting rooms. However I did enjoy the change in routine and scenery, and I had a few happenstance conversations, which I don’t generally have online.

We had a debrief about the Advance HE/HEDG shareshop we did on transition. We also thought about future ideas, including dual mode delivery and curriculum planning.

Friday saw myself deliver a repeat of the second session of an online Digital Leadership programme to a cohort of university staff. It was a slightly shorter session as I had a conference to present at later that morning.

The conference was a Westminster Higher Education Forum policy conference: Next steps for reforming the TEF and ensuring teaching excellence in HE. My session was entitled Driving up standards and supporting teaching excellence in remote and blended learning.

I talked about definitions, background, the emergency response and the implications of differentiating between translation and transformation. I also discussed the topic of digital poverty.

meeting
Image by StartupStockPhotos from Pixabay

In the afternoon I did some analysis of the planning that universities were taking in respect to transition that came out of the shareshop we did on transition.

The main themes that came out of the online padlet discussion were:

  • Building online communities
  • The importance of student (and staff) wellbeing
  • Supporting and developing academic skills
  • Developing inductions and planning welcome weeks
  • Building digital skills
  • Returning to on campus delivery

One of the key themes that came out of the padlet discussion was the value and importance of building online communities. As one delegate pointed out in their planning, they felt it was important in supporting them to socialise and feel part of the community. One university wanted to increase connectedness and a sense of belonging to the university community.

As with academic skills (but slightly less commentary) the disruption to both new students and returning students, many comments were made about supporting and developing the digital skills of students. There was a recognition that many students did not have the (academic) digital skills to successfully engage with online and blended learning. As one participant said there was a need to be supporting the digital skills needed to access the course and related services. Another said we overestimated the students ability to use and engage with online content.

My top tweet this week was this one.

Day 25: EdTech Klaxon

->-> Digital Natives <-<-

laptop user
Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

My EdTech Klaxon goes off each time I hear the term Digital Natives. This thoroughly debunked term for labelling young people is often used to describe how the fact that as young people use digital technology then they are extremely competent in using digital technology for all aspects of their life, and in the case of students for teaching and learning.

The reality is that digital is not static, it is a constantly moving feast, the technology or digital tools they grew up with is not necessarily the technology and digital tools they will use today.

Also just because you are confident in the use of say, one consumer technology, this doesn’t mean you have the skills, capabilities and confidence to use all digital tools and technologies. This is very much the case with educational technologies.

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day 24: Favourite theory read

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

TALL blog » Blog Archive » Not ‘Natives’ & ‘Immigrants’ but ‘Visitors’ & ‘Residents’ by 

Not ‘Natives’ & ‘Immigrants’ but ‘Visitors’ & ‘Residents’

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day23: Best conference merch

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

I could say the iPad I got, but it was a prize, so guessing doesn’t count.

I really loved my Cambridge University Press mug I got at UKSG in 2011. I used for many years across three jobs and then it got smashed.

I’ve always liked the pick and mix, or jars of sweets I have managed to swag at various conferences. They were always very much appreciated by the children at home, well those bags that managed to make their way home.

sweets

The really nice notebooks that seem to be the order of the day in the last few years have been useful as well.

I also liked the Canvas t-shirts which they use to give away.

The downside of online events over the last eighteen months has been that there has been no chance or opportunity to get some swag or merch. 

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day 22: EdTech Metaphors

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

Tanker
Image by Gerhard Traschütz from Pixabay

I use metaphors a lot when I am discussing edtech or delivering training.

One example that others use which I blogged about was steering a supertanker…

The reality is that steering a supertanker is quite easy and they are in fact highly manoeuvrable, they have to be to dock at refineries and ports across the world.

Steering a supertanker…

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day 21: Most used website

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

chromebook
Image by 377053 from Pixabay

I have no idea. Mainly as I use multiple devices and browsers. 

On Chrome on my iMac, it would be Twitter, but on Safari it probably is something else.

On the iPad it’s probably BBC News, the Guardian or Wikipedia.

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).

Day 20: Most influenced by…

This post is part of the #JuneEdTechChallenge series.

This was a challenging one, as there are lots of people who have influenced me over the years, and it would be difficult to name just one.

Early influences have been and gone and even today I am inspired and influenced by people I meet and chat with.

Though I didn’t post these posts each day in June (and to be honest I didn’t post it each day on the Twitter either) except the final day, I have decided to retrospectively post blog posts about each of the challenges and back date them accordingly. There is sometimes more I want to say on the challenge then you can fit into 140 characters (well 280 these days).