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    “Reinventing” Textbooks, I don’t think so!

    So has Apple reinvented the textbook?

    I don’t think so.

    Today in New York, Apple gave a presentation which announced three new products and services for education, iBooks 2, iBooks Author and an iTunes U app.

    With iBooks 2 it is now possible to read e-books that also contain media and interactive content

    I have to say to Apple and all those sites out there that are saying iBooks 2 has reinvented textbooks, I don’t think so. I felt a little underwhelmed by the textbooks that were announced by Apple. They are for all intents and purposes digitised textbooks with some fancy video, slideshows and other effects. There are already apps within the iOS App Store that provide a similar experience, the Dorling Kindersley releases for example. I have already reviewed some of these in my review series, and I think some of those, such as Eureka, are much more innovative and exciting.

    Don’t get me wrong, the use of video, animations, slideshows, 3D diagrams, interactivity can be so much better than the diagrams and photographs in a paper book. We mustn’t though forget that interactive doesn’t always mean engaging. Sometimes something very uninteractive and be very engaging, likewise in the past many interactive textbooks (we called them CD-ROMS back then) did not engage learners. It takes a lot of skill and thought to create engaging interactive content, and clever animations and video is only part of the picture.

    What is missing is the Apple magic in the user interface. iBooks and devices such as the Kindle work for “normal” books such as novels and non-fiction where the reader moves from one page to another in a linear fashion. From a user’s perspective, the experience is comparable.

    However this is not how academic textbooks are used by learners. Learners rarely (if ever) read an academic textbook from page to page. No they are more likely to flick through the pages to the relevant chapter or section, flick back to other parts of the book as they make notes, sometimes on the book (annotations) but also on paper (or using a word processor). Now you can do that in iBooks 2, but not nearly as easily and smoothly as you can with a paper book.

    In May 2010, I wrote about how the Seattle Times outlined how student at the University of Washington did not like using the Kindle compared to using printed books.

    There were some interesting results and comments from the pilot. 80% would not recommend the Kindle as a classroom study aid for example. However 90% liked it for reading for pleasure.

    Though I hazard a guess that maybe a slightly lower percentage would not recommend the iPad as a classroom study aid, I said back then:

    This is a lesson that educational publishers need to recognise when publishing content to platforms like the Kindle and the iPad. Though novels are linear and as a result eBook formats can “work” like a printed book, educational books are used differently and as a result eBook versions need to work differently. Students need to be able to move around quickly, annotate and bookmark.

    Creating a digital copy of an academic textbook for a lot of learners is not going to work, as it doesn’t allow them to use the digital textbook in the way that they would use a paper copy. There needs to be a paradigm shift in understanding how learners use content, so that the advantages that a device such as the iPad can bring to learning are fully exploited and learners are not left thinking that the digital version is a poor relation of the paper textbook.

    Those advantages that Apple outlined in their presentation that the iPad is portable, durable, interactive, searchable and current are just part of the story, digitising content misses out on the other advantages that the iPad brings to the desk. The touch interface offers so much more than just highlighting and flicking backwards and forwards in a linear fashion. Magazines such as Eureka and Wired have started to understand that, I am surprised that Apple haven’t.

    There is also a complete lack of communication and sharing within iBooks 2. Learners are unable to share their annotations, copy their notes to their peers, discuss the content. All that is missing from iBooks 2, it is about consuming content, individually and then probably writing about it using Pages or creating a spreadsheet in Numbers.

    The new textbooks in iBooks 2 make the mistake of creating a digital equivalent of the paper book with a few added bells and whistles and does not take advantage of the iPad interface and connectivity that could add so much. Textbooks need a new way of thinking, however this time Apple are not thinking differently enough.

    What do you think?

    11 Responses to ““Reinventing” Textbooks, I don’t think so!”

    1. Leon Cych says:

      The HTML 5 elements if allowed would let in crowdsourcing and all those elements via the web native back door acting as a Trojan Mouse into the app perhaps?

    2. Leon Cych says:

      It will also be the synchronous comms elements in the books that might be of interest…and how to make any sort of E-Book is going to be an invaluable skill

    3. AllDaySCI-fi says:

      Ever fall asleep reading a textbook? The computer can be programmed to alarm if you don’t turn the page in 10 minutes. Try that with a textbook.

    4. [...] “Reinventing” Textbooks, I don’t think so! (elearningstuff.net) [...]

    5. [...] wasn’t too impressed with iBooks 2, on the other hand, iBooks Author I think has real potential for practitioners in [...]

    6. Henry Fuller says:

      Regardless of what people think about the new iBook authoring app, I think it’s great that Apple have turned their focus to education (for the time being). Apple have taken a step with the new digital textbooks, but not so great as to scare people off. I imagine this is just the start of Apple really utilising the capabilities of it’s mobile devices for education.

    7. Henry Fuller says:

      The web has given us an inexhaustible amount of free educational content and this new iBook authoring software could be an ideal way for teachers to structure and present it as they see fit. This surely will surely give the educators more freedom in teaching how, and what they want to teach, without being stifled by the rigidity of the classic text book. By the way, I do appreciate the value of the text books as a preferred method of learning… for some people.

    8. [...] services for education, iBooks 2, iBooks Author and an iTunes U app. I’ve already written about iBooks 2 and iBooks Author, so what about iTunes [...]

    9. [...] “Reinventing” Textbooks, I don’t think so! (elearningstuff.net) [...]

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