Tag Archives: privacy

Privacy has gone…

Do we have privacy anymore, do we have privacy with the internet now being so much part of our lives?

The opening keynote at the Plymouth e-Learning Conference 2010 was by Josie Fraser. She delivered an inspiring thought provoking keynote covering many different issues including digital identity, digital communities and communities of practice.

One of the key discussions was on privacy and the ability to control what I put online on services such as Twitter, this blog, Flickr or even (now and again) Facebook.

I can do lots to protect my identity.

I can decide what photographs I post to Flickr.

I can decide whether to include geo-data when I post to Twitter or use Audioboo.

What about the issue of other people infringing my privacy and putting details of my life online.

I can’t stop other people from broadcasting what I am doing…

I can’t stop them taking and posting photographs on me online.

I can’t stop them writing about what I am doing on services like Twitter and Facebook.

I can’t stop them uploading videos of me to YouTube.

I won’t be able to stop them adding geo-data to images or videos of me.

These services that people have used have take down policies, but unless the images, video or text are “not nice” then would the services taken them down because I don’t like them?

Of course I can ask, but they don’t need to say yes!

We seem to be at a stage where privacy is almost impossible to maintain if you go anywhere that others will be using cameras, online services such as Twitter or Facebook; even if I don’t use any of these things myself.

Josie in her keynote showed us the Ungooglable Man.

Does he exist? Probably?

Does he exist online? More than likely!

Even if he doesn’t use Myspace or Facebook, it is likely that friends and family do. They may place photographs of him online, they may talk about him, they may have videos of him. As a result he may be found online despite the fact that he is not online himself.

There are implications for those who have concerns about their own online identities that they may well have no power to stop others posting “stuff” about them online.

At the moment, many colleges are looking to work with learners on the concept of e-safety, part of which is digital identity. Colleges need to remind individuals that they are not the only person who needs to be concerned about what they post online, but that their friends and family need to be aware of the issues too.

Do you worry about what is posted about you online?

Do you know what others have posted about you online?

Should we care?

e-Learning Tech Stuff episode #001 – Removing your browsing history from the Asus EeePC

We have decided to deploy some Asus EeePCs in our college Libraries as short term loan computers to provide extra access to computing when we are busy and for those learners who want a smaller computer footprint when working on their learning.

One thing that learners may want to do is remove their browsing history from the EeePC to ensure that all cookies and password are removed.

This simple guide shows how to remove the browsing history from an Asus EeePC.

Download the iPod version in MP4 format.

Live at the MoLeNET 2008 Conference

Decided to broadcast my question to the MoLeNET 2008 Question Time panel live over Qik. I was asking the question how should colleges address services such as Qik, Flickr and YouTube in regard to privacy, data protection and copyright. All views expressed are those of the individuals only.

[vodpod id=ExternalVideo.692678&w=425&h=350&fv=]

more about "Live at the MoLeNET 2008 Conference", posted with vodpod

"Facebook Profiles Will Appear in Google Results Next Month"

According to an article on Mashable, your Facebook profile will be appearing on Google next month.

If you thought the news feed was a threat to your privacy, be warned: Facebook is announcing Public Search Listings today, meaning profiles will be searchable through Facebook, and soon turn up on Google, Yahoo and MSN Search.

As of tomorrow, search will be available through Facebook; users will then have one month to change their privacy settings before profiles get indexed by the major search engines. These results will include, at most, your name and profile picture.

So anything on there you would not want a current, prospective, future employer or family member or associate or your bank manager or insurance company to view, remove it now before it’s too late!

Google Street View Privacy Issues

In the Tensions between personal space and social space in mobile learning symposium John Cook mentioned Google Street View and mentioned privacy issues.

I heckled from the back about how not only are you viewable on Google Street View but your image may then make the rounds on social news sites such as Digg. As you can see from here there are quite a few Digg front page stories that focus on Google Street View. Remember that a Digg story with two thousand odd diggs, will generally generate about fifty to a hundred thousand page views!

Personally I think it is a real issue and can only get worse.

It reminds me of a novel I once read in which privacy disappears (not through the internet but by wormholes).

The Light of Other Days looks at how the invention of wormholes which allow you to view anywhere anytime impact on society.

‘Space is what keeps everything from being in the same place. Right?’ With these words Hiram Patterson, head of the giant media corporation OurWorld, launches the greatest communications revolution in history. With OurWorld’s development of wormhole technology, any point in space can be connected to any other, faster than the speed of light. Realtime television coverage is here: earthquakes and wars, murders and disasters can be watched, exactly as they occur, anywhere on the planet. Then WormCams are made to work across time as well as space. Humanity encounters itself in the light of other days. We witness the life of Jesus, go to the premiere of Hamlet, solve the enigmas that have baffled generations. Blood spilled centuries ago flows vividly once more – and no personal treachery or shame can be concealed. But when the world and everything in it becomes as transparent as glass and there are no more secrets, people find new ways to gain vengeance and commit crime, and Hiram Patterson finds new ways to keep his Machiavellian schemes secret.’