Tag Archives: google drive

Top Ten Web Tools of 2015

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This is the eighth time I have compiled a list of the top ten web tools I have used during the year. I am finding it interesting looking back over 2008, 2009, 2010201120122013 and 2014 which tools I still use and which have fallen by the wayside.

Out of the top ten are Chrome, Safari and Google+. I still like the positive aspects of Chrome and Safari, I like the fact that I can move between devices and take up where I left off and having a common history regardless of device. Though using a Dell has meant Safari integration is less useful. Google+ probably would have made the top ten, but the community I am part of is using it less and less, so there is less engagement and less conversation.

Instagram is number ten for 2015, I have found that the community I engaged with has shrunk over the last twelve months. I still like it as a tool and as a community.

Dropbox was my number one technology in 2014 and I used it in a similar way for some of 2015. However when I started using a Dell as my main workhorse, the benefits of working on a single Pages document across multiple Macs disappeared and though I still like Dropbox, I now use it more for remote online storage than as a synced cloud solution for working on files across multiple machines. As a result it drops to ninth place in the top ten.

Evernote in a similar vein to Dropbox was well used in the earlier part of 2015, but less so in the latter half, so drops to number eight. I mainly use Evernote to make notes and planning. One feature I started using extensively in November and December was to use the Evernote app on the iPhone to capture post-its and flipcharts from meetings and workshops. The auto-capture feature was a chance discovery and I found it perfect for quickly capturing hand-written information and sharing it with others.

At number seven is Flickr. I use Flickr to both store and find photographs. I used it a lot to find images for presentations.

At number six is Google Docs (and Google Drive), from a collaboration perspective it is one of the best tools I have used. I like the fact that a team can work on a document all at the same time.

The fifth tool in the top ten is Tweetdeck. Using a consistent hashtag for projects means that Tweetdeck is a faster way to find out who is talking about the project and what they are talking about on the Twitter. I like how I can use it to schedule tweets in advance, this proved particularly useful for a Tweetchat I did for the ALT Winter Conference.

At number four is Yammer, this Enterprise “social network” has allowed me to internally update Jisc on the project work and keep people across the organisation informed on what we are doing and where we are at.

Third place is Skype and Skype for Business. I used Skype for many years for external online conversations, but when I moved jobs in 2013, I stopped using it. Now at Jisc I use it on a daily basis for online meetings, conferences and instant messaging.

Climbing up to number two for 2015 is WordPress. Having not used it much in 2014, it became much more integral to the way I worked. As well as my personal blogs such as this one, I also use it for my work blog and have also been using it to prototype an online delivery platform, as a kind of dynamic connectivist VLE.

Twitter is my number one technology for 2015, after limited use in the first part of 2015, it really became an indispensable tool for me for the rest of 2015. I use it much more for broadcasting, conversations and engagement.

So that’s my top ten web tools for 2015, what were yours?

Top Ten Web Tools of 2014

This is the seventh time I have compiled a list of the top ten web tools I have used during the year. I am finding it interesting looking back over 2008, 2009, 201020112012 and 2013 which tools I still use and which have fallen by the wayside.

Out of the top ten are speakerdeck and slideshare, as well as Flipboard. Flipboard really died for me when Google Reader was shut down.

At number ten in the top ten is Instagram. I still like Instagram and use it quite a bit to share photographs.

The ninth web tool for 2014 was WordPress, it’s a great piece of blogging software, and however I have not made as much use of it this year as in previous years.

At number eight is Flickr. I use Flickr to both store and find photographs. I used it a lot to find images for presentations.

Chrome and Safari are joint seventh, I like the fact that I can move between devices and take up where I left off and having a common history regardless of device.

Evernote is number six, I started again to make more use of Evernote to make notes and planning.

Google Docs (and Google Drive) is fifth in the top ten. From a collaboration perspective it is one of the best tools I have used. I like the fact that a team can work on a document all at the same time.

Twitter is at number four. I have found Twitter less useful this year and have used it a lot less than in previous years.

The third technology is Google Hangouts, which has proved very useful for meetings and discussions both internally and externally.

Second in the top ten is Google+. I find it more useful and powerful than Twitter. I like the conversations, the communities and adding photographs

My top web tool for 2014 is Dropbox though I use Google Drive for collaboration, from an individual perspective I like Dropbox, as it means I can work on files anywhere on my work Mac, my home iMac or my Macbook Air. What I like about it more than anything else, it just works. I like how I can use the Dropbox app on the iPad and iPhone to upload images and screengrabs to be used on my desktop machines.

Apps and Google Drive

Over on my Tech Stuff Blog I have written a short blog post about adding apps to Google Drive.

Adding Apps to Google Drive

I was quite impressed with how easy it was to add apps and liked the added functionality it brings to Google Docs. In the blog post I have shown a couple of useful edtech apps, mind mapping and MoveNote. Still working out what else it can do and importantly the limitations.

One of the real advantages of this, is that learners can use their computer at home, at college or work, without needing to worry about installing software, or having files they can’t work on as there isn’t the application on the hardware.